My Son would Never Rape a Woman

Rohit Bhute:

A very well written piece about how relatives of rape accused often blame the victim and turn their biases into defence of the accused.

Originally posted on Epiphany in the Cacophony:

sad-alone-cute-girl-waiting-someone-window My son would never rape a woman. It is brutal, disgusting and immoral. He simply isn’t capable of such a thing. She has obviously enticed him. __________________________________________________________

She was at the club when it happened. Short black dress, tall black drink. She stood in the middle of the dance floor, moved her hips slowly. She made eye contact with him. She even smiled. He walked up to her and asked her to meet him at his car. When she declined, he grabbed her arm.
And what a scene she created! She fought, screamed and kicked. You want this, he told her as he pulled her out of the club. NO, she screamed, yelling as he dragged her to his car. You don’t know what you want, you’re drunk.

She sat alone in the parking lot a few hours later. Disgusting girl, she reeked of smoke and alcohol. What…

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When The Rainbow Bled – 2

I actually went beyond stating facts and allowed my emotions to seep through in the first rainbow post. I was frustrated that a good guy turned out to have feet of clay. I was unnerved by the sheer vindictiveness shown by the LGBT activists.

There is reason behind the vindictiveness. Just like the Caitlin family, there are plenty of stories about how lack of equal rights have hampered same-sex couples – legally, financially and socially. These are not hypothetical but real, tangible issues – not being able to get your partner under insurance cover, not being able to get a visa to visit your country, threat of being fired from your job. All this, over and above basic discrimination in all spheres of life. Some of the victims are members of the Mozilla community.

When these activists found out that Eich was being elevated to be the face of Mozilla, they found a target for their collective anger. Just as society and government brought down the full weight of their disapproval on each victim at a time, these activists bore down on Eich like a tsunami of vengeance. It is easier to destroy the CEO of a company creating a non-essential yet high-profile product dependent on its community, than taking the fight country-wide (world-wide?) against all those other bigots in public and private offices. They have put Eich’s head on stake to serve as a warning to others.

Maybe we, the outsiders, would have preferred to see a little less vindictiveness. A little more restraint. Maybe we feel pity for Eich who has been driven away from the community he created 15 years ago. This is not a justification for either the activists or Eich. But we don’t know the extent of misery the LGBT victims have gone through. We can never have a full grasp of their anger. Right now, their policy is to destroy any opponent they can with as much publicity as they can get. They are not in the mood for taking prisoners. This is only turning them into the monsters they hate, though they may not acknowledge it.

We can only hope that as their win their victories, as their misery reduces, they learn to be tolerant of dissenting views. One day, let’s hope they learn to be gracious victors.

When The Rainbow Bled Black

The way Brendan Eich has been hounded in the last couple of weeks has left me feeling uneasy. To clarify my thoughts, I would like to lay them out here.

First, Eich holds a personal view – of not supporting marriage between same-sex individuals – that is not in line with my own. This is fine, to the extent that he does not bring it in his interaction with others – colleagues, strangers on the street, etc. To all accounts, Eich has managed to keep his opinions and biases to himself and conducted his public interactions professionally.

Many people ask whether I will work under a boss who has been known to support subverting any of my rights. Yes, I will. Supporting subversion of rights and actually subverting them are two different things. The moment he does the latter, (in the words of H. Caitlin), the gloves come off.

Second, today, it is possible for Mozilla employees and community members to raise voices about how their personal rights are being prejudiced. Who do you think was among the founders and mentors of the “community” that these protestors are part of? Eich would never have guessed that the “open”, “tolerant” and “inclusive” tenets of the community he fostered would one day be used to oust him from the place. The Mozillians who voiced their concerns and uneasiness did not put forward one example when Eich’s personal bias had resulted in him discriminating in any way against anyone from the community . Nope, it was all a chorus of “OMG, our personal views don’t match. He might turn Big Bad Wolf on us”; never mind that Eich was pledging like a prisoner before the parole board to uphold Mozilla’s standards of equality and tolerance. The standards he helped create. The word “ungrateful” is not strong enough.

NoteI have seen extraordinarily similar arguments on different sites like Reddit. But I have seen them first on the Rarebit blog and Twitter feeds. This is not an attack on Caitlins or Rarebit so much as using them as a reference for the mob that lynched Eich. It seems fitting given how they made Eich a figurehead of LGBT hate.

Third, about his prop8 support affecting “families on the ground”. Rarebit founders, the Caitlins, say this was akin to a direct attack on their family and they cannot do business with an individual such as him.

Eich was acting completely within the framework that US and Californian laws had specified. He did nothing illegal. To bring his action to the same level as thugs bursting into your home with assault rifles is wrong. It’s in bad taste. Will they go after other people who have engaged in similar “direct attacks” on their family? Adobe, Boeing and Intel employees donated to prop8 support. Will they stop using Adobe products? Check that the plane they are boarding is not a Boeing aircraft? Don’t use any Intel-powered devices? Prop8 was passed, which meant a majority of Californians voted for it. Did the Caitlins stop all socio-economic interaction with those (more than 50%) Californians?

If Eich putting (what to him was) chump change towards a cause he personally believed in is a direct attack on their family, then logically and emotively, isn’t what the Caitlins have done a direct personal attack on Eich? It seems to me that Caitlins aren’t just looking out for family, they also want to turn the world blind.

This is like me complaining about a co-worker to my company HR because his kid beat up my kid on the school ground. Each issue has its own place. Eich successfully kept his bias in his personal domain. There is zero proof that he ever let it influence his work at Mozilla. The Caitlins linked it to their business and brought it into the public domain.

Furthermore, this was battle fought within bounds. Just as Eich donated in support of prop8, others donated to stop prop8. Even if the law was initially passed, it was overturned by the courts later. The battle was won. As far as Eich was concerned, he fought it fair and square. Yes, five years (in fact, even a minute, a moment) is too long to reverse an unjust act, but the Caitlins won. Eich lost. His personal belief was consigned to his personal domain. What more did they want? What did they achieve from the act of posting “five reason for Eich to step down”? The Caitlins should admit it – they ask for equal rights and tolerance but are not ready to give quarter to an opponent who has lost. They wanted more. They wanted revenge. They wanted total submission. And they found a vulnerable, juicy target.

Many people said that this was not an attack on free speech or thought – rather, you can have free speech but you should also be prepared to face the consequences and criticism generated by that free speech. Oh, then you should have checked H. Caitlin’s Twitter feed. Complaining and wallowing in sadness about the negativity the Internet was directing at them. Gee, in the name of your family, you drove away a man from his baby. One that he had nurtured for 15 years. One that you were using to drive your own business. You drove him off Twitter. Away from public. Days after he reached the pinnacle of his professional life, you forced a man “to take time away from work”. How about you face up to the consequences of free speech now?

Finally, the less said about OKCupid, the better. This business, which monetizes one of the most vulnerable sections of society, decided to protest Eich’s $1000 donation made in 2008.

Let’s see, one of their co-founders – Sam Yagan – donated $500 twice to the Obama campaign from 2007 to 2008. Yagan also donated $500 to Utah Republican Congressman, Chris Cannon, in 2004. Cannon voted in favour of a constitutional ban on same-sex marriage. Another co-founder, Christian Rudder, donated $1,000 to Obama’s 2012 campaign. Obama supported same-sex marriage only in 2012, not before that.

That is $2500 donated towards politicians who were not in support of same-sex marriage. So, what exactly are OKCupid protesting?

In summation, while Eich’s views were certainly not progressive, they were well contained to his personal domain and did not have any proven effect on his working within Mozilla. Instead people chose to see shadows where there were none and drove a deserving man from his place in the sun.

Back to (an improved) Cinnamon Desktop

I had moved away from Cinnamon DE around Feb 2013. Cinnamon represents a very elegant alternative to other DEs – striking the right balance between simplicity and configurability. That said, there were still some irritants; most prominent being that Pidgin would disappear predictably from the system tray. This would leave me with no notification when a conversation was updated. After having been bitten once too many times, I gave up and installed KDE. I was never quite at peace though. Updates on the Linux Mint blog about Cinnamon 1.8 provided me the kick to move back to Cinnamon and see if things had improved.

They certainly have! After the default install, I did some tweaking to reduce my earlier complaints.

1. The first change was to enable boot animation. I simply changed the Plymouth theme to use the Linux Mint default. The FRAMEBUFFER bit is a fix for delayed boot animation. Use it if the animation appears late in the start-up sequence and disappears almost immediately.

sudo -s
update-alternatives --config default.plymouth
echo FRAMEBUFFER=y >> /etc/initramfs-tools/conf.d/splash
update-initramfs -u

2. Enable hibernation after checking that hibernation works with sudo pm-hibernate.

sudo nano /etc/polkit-1/localauthority/50-local.d/com.ubuntu.enable-hibernate.pkla

# add the following lines in the file
[Re-enable hibernate by default]
Identity=unix-user:*
Action=org.freedesktop.upower.hibernate
ResultActive=yes

# save and update grub
sudo update-grub

3. Reduce grub time-out from 10 to 5 seconds

# in /etc/default/grub
GRUB_TIMEOUT=5

# save and update grub
sudo update-grub

4. Fix the Pidgin system tray icon issue. There was a workaround suggested on Cinnamon’s issue tracker. First you have to locate the icon being used in the system tray. Then you swap out the 16px icon for the 22px version. The result looks something like below.

rohit@raijin ~ $ ls -l /usr/share/pixmaps/pidgin/tray/Mint-X/status
total 16
lrwxrwxrwx 1 root root    2 Sep  6 15:06 16 -> 22
drwxr-xr-x 2 root root 4096 Aug 31 14:53 16old
drwxr-xr-x 2 root root 4096 Aug 31 14:53 22
drwxr-xr-x 2 root root 4096 Aug 31 14:53 32
drwxr-xr-x 2 root root 4096 Aug 31 14:53 48

What else?

  • The notifications applet used to hold notifications that aren’t dismissed is a good idea.
  • There is still an overlap in the menu entries in Administration and Preferences – quite perplexing why that hasn’t been fixed.
  • There are two System Settings – one for Cinnamon and another for GNOME. At least that is how I interpreted it.
    Two System Settings in Cinnamon 1.8 on Linux Mint 13

    Two System Settings in Cinnamon 1.8 on Linux Mint 13

    The one on the left is the GNOME one, I suspect. Notice the missing icons for the section headers. This is since Cinnamon 1.6.

The Cinnamon development team has promised bigger and better things for version 2. I have no doubt they will deliver. It remains to be seen whether it will back-ported to Linux Mint 13 or users are asked to wait for the next LTS version – Linux Mint 17.

Are you taking drugs made by Ranbaxy?

I had heard rumblings about some US regulatory bodies taking action on Ranbaxy. At first, I was not interested in the details – it sounded too much like American protectionism. But this article on Firstpost was an eye-opener.

However, after five years of legal battle, now Ranbaxy has pleaded guilty of the same wrong doings that it was exonerated of. The company has admitted to selling adulterated drugs from the two plants and submitting false statements to the FDA.

Take a minute. Step back from the screen. This is not financial fraud. Not an industrial espionage or a patent litigation case. We are talking about medicine. Make no mistake – flooding markets with cheap generics is good.  But what sort of sick psychopath floods the market with adulterated, untested drugs? It is right out of a Bond film.

I followed a link and came upon one of the worse indictments possible for a pharmaceutical company. Do yourself a favour and read the report. Some highlights of report are listed below. Text in italics is quoted directly from the article.

  • Standard operating procedures for clinical studies and drug testing, manufacturing and storage facilities were violated – sometimes, the company would create its own SOPs to prove compliance on paper.
  • senior managers of the company, heads of research and development, people responsible for formulation … clinical people – all were “in” on this game.
  • Drug tests were carried out with actual brand-name drugs substituted in place of the generics meant to be tested.
  • Drug degradation (“expiry date”) was almost always under-reported. This means medicines would expire sooner than mentioned on the label.
  • crucial testing data for many of the company’s drugs did not actually exist and submissions to regulators had been forged.
  • “There was a total lack of understanding,” Dr. Kathy Spreen (former executive director of clinical medicine and pharmacovigilance, Ranbaxy U.S.) says, “of what it meant to be ethical and what it meant to actually protect the patient.”
  • Six other pharma veterans who worked for Ranbaxy in the U.S. as recently as 2010 tell Fortune they found themselves in a corporate culture like nothing they’d ever experienced. Executives approached the regulatory system as an obstacle to be gamed. They bragged about who had most artfully deceived regulators.
  • In Europe, for example, the company used ingredients from unapproved sources, invented shelf-life data, tested different formulations of the drug than the ones it sold, and made undocumented changes to the manufacturing process.
  • In entire markets—including Brazil, Kenya, Ethiopia, Uganda, Egypt, Myanmar, Thailand, Vietnam, Peru and the Dominican Republic—the company had simply not tested the drugs and had invented all the data.
  • The company had a “reputation for threatening people, bullying people,” Dinesh Thakur (former global head of psychiatry for clinical research and development, Ranbaxy) recalls.
  • Ranbaxy used its international staff as drug mules to bring brand-name drugs to India – violating import-export laws of multiple nations.
  • “Every single inspector that went to India said they would never take a Ranbaxy drug,” says David Nelson (former senior investigator, House Energy and Commerce Committee), “like eight out of eight.”
  • One by one, each of the former Ranbaxy executives Fortune interviewed had determined, while still at the company, to stop taking Ranbaxy drugs.
  • Ranbaxy has been recalling its blockbuster drugs at an alarming rate in the US.

Dinesh Thakur – the whistle-blower.

The question remains – why are Indian regulators moving so slowly? Why is Indian media – print, TV, Internet – silent? Ranbaxy should be splashed on the front page of every newspaper and news portal. The intent here should not be to protect Ranbaxy but the Indian generic drugs industry and patients – both Indian and international – who depend on generics for their medical needs. Only by taking Ranbaxy to task and verifying that its systems and processes are in order can confidence be restored.

I don’t know about you, but from now on, I will be assiduously avoiding the Ranbaxy brand. The pity is I can do so only if there is an alternative that I know about.

What about the millions who do not have the means to search for and procure alternatives?